Many Things Define Us: Tobacco Shouldn’t Be One of Them

Many Things Define Us: Tobacco Shouldn’t Be One of Them

Big Tobacco doesn’t see us as unique individuals. It sees us as easy money – as a target audience who is 40% to 70% more likely to smoke than the general population. We didn’t come out of the closet just to be labeled and stereotyped. We are artist. Dog owners. Amateur food critics. Film buffs. Don’t let Big Tobacco define us. We can do that ourselves. For help quitting, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

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Free Family Fun and Fitness Night

Free Family Fun and Fitness Night

Mondays, 6-8 pm Marshall White Center Join Project Success’ Harambee Tobacco & Health Network as we have some fun, learn new games, & meet new people. Sign up & earn prizes along the way! FOR MORE INFO CALL BUTCH SAWYER @ 801-940-0394 EMAIL: Projectsuccessinc1@gmail.com

Back-to-School

Back-to-School

Parents & Students
Saturday, August 13 11am – 2pm
Marshall White Center 222 28th St.
Free Lunch
Resource Information
Learn how to Connect with Teachers & Administrators
Games & More!
For Info Call: 801-394-0924

FREE SCHOOL SUPPLIES
UNDERSTANDING YOUR EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS
HOW TO MEET WITH TEACHERS & PRINCIPALS
SCHOOL RESOURCES AND SERVICES
DENTAL SCREENING
FREE HAIR CUTS!

2016 Juneteenth Utah Festival

2016 Juneteenth Utah Festival

Utah Education Network has developed a website for
our newly created Juneteenth Holiday.

H.B. 338 Juneteenth Holiday Observance was passed during the 2016 Utah legislative session.
If you did not know, Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States and H.B. 338 states that Juneteenth Freedom Day shall be commemorated annually in Utah on the third Saturday in June.  (June 18, 2016)
In support of this bill, the Utah Education Network developed a Juneteenth Freedom Day webpage.
You can find a link to this page on our handy dandy Resources for K-12 Education page: http://www.uen.org/k12educator/uenresources.php

 

 27th Juneteenth Utah Festival

June 17-18,  2016

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2016
Forms

Juneteenth Performance Contract
Corporate Booth Application
Community Vendor Application

Scholarship Pageant Information Sheet
Pageant Application Form

Online Forms

Juneteenth Performance Demo Submission
Juneteenth Community Vendor Application
Juneteenth Corporate Booth Form

Juneteenth information links

www.historynet.com/abolitionist-movement

For more information please contact :

Project Success Coalition, Inc.
P.O. Box 151003
Ogden, UT 84415

Phone: 801-394-0924

Fax: 801-399-4577

Betty Sawyer
Email : projectsuccessinc1@gmail.com[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ width=”1/3″][vc_column_text]

2016 Juneteenth Mr. and Ms. Juneteenth Scholarship Pageant

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The pageant application process runs April 1st through June 1st.
Our 2016 Juneteenth Freedom and Heritage Festival will be held on June 17-18 at Weber State University, from noon until 9:00 p.m. each day.
We look forward to having you join us for this important community celebration. The pageant is open to high school 11th & 12th grade students throughout Utah.
We extend a special thanks to Daryl and Nikki Davis for co-sponsoring the monetary scholarships for this year’s pageant!

 

For information contact: Project Success at 801-394-0924  projectsuccessinc1@gmail.com or brenda_burrell@msn.com
Dr. Brenda Burrell , Pageant Chairperson

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6:15am 2.5 min segment:
Activity: New Juneteenth Day Holiday Bill & Food with Tricia’s Dishes
Name of person we are talking to: Rep. Sandra Hollins & Patricia Felton

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6:45am 2.5 min segment:

Activity: Fun Games & Activities
Name of person we are talking to:  Kelly Boyce, WSU Campus Recreation

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7AM
7:15am 1.5 min segment:
Activity: Harambee Tobacco & Health,  Family Fun & Fitness Program
Name of person we are talking to: Ikwo Frank, Tobacco Youth Council

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7:45am 2.5 min segment:
Activity: Gospel Music
Name of person we are talking to: Montenna Porter

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8AM

8:15am 1.5 min segment:
Activity: Juneteenth Flag Presentation (Flag Day)
Name of person we are talking to: Betty Sawyer

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8:45am 1.5 min segment:
Activity: Rap/Hip Hop
Name of person we are talking to: Shard Marley

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Painting the imaginations

Painting the imaginations

Dolphins have a streamlined fusiform body, adapted for fast swimming. The tail fin, called the fluke, is used for propulsion while the pectoral fins, together with the entire tail section, provide directional control. The dorsal fin, in those species that have one, provides stability while swimming. Though varying by species, basic coloration patterns are shades of grey, usually with a lighter underside and often with lines and patches of different hue and contrast. Unlike most mammals, dolphins do not have hair, except for a few hairs around the tip of their rostrum (beak) which they lose shortly before or after birth.[23] The only exception to this is the Boto river dolphin, which has persistent small hairs on the rostrum.

Senses

Most dolphins have acute eyesight, both in and out of the water, and they can hear frequencies ten times or more above the upper limit of adult human hearing.[31] Though they have a small ear opening on each side of their head, it is believed hearing underwater is also, if not exclusively, done with the lower jaw, which conducts sound to the middle ear via a fat-filled cavity in the lower jaw bone. Hearing is also used for echolocation, which all dolphins have. Dolphin teeth are believed to function as antennae to receive incoming sound and to pinpoint the exact location of an object.[32] Beyond locating an object, echolocation also provides the animal with an idea on the object’s shape and size, though how exactly this works is not yet understood.[33] The Indus Dolphin is effectively blind. This may be because not much light penetrates the waters of the Indus river (due to suspended sediments), making the need for vision unnecessary.

The dolphin’s sense of touch is also well-developed, with free nerve endings densely packed in the skin, especially around the snout, pectoral fins and genital area. However, dolphins lack an olfactory nerve and lobes, and thus are believed to have no sense of smell.[35] They do have a sense of taste and show preferences for certain kinds of fish. Since dolphins spend most of their time below the surface, tasting the water could function like smelling, in that substances in the water can signal the presence of objects that are not in the dolphin’s mouth.

A group of dolphins is called a “school” or a “pod”. Male dolphins are called “bulls”, females “cows” and young dolphins are called “calves”.

Potter working a piece of clay

Potter working a piece of clay

Dolphins have a streamlined fusiform body, adapted for fast swimming. The tail fin, called the fluke, is used for propulsion while the pectoral fins, together with the entire tail section, provide directional control. The dorsal fin, in those species that have one, provides stability while swimming. Though varying by species, basic coloration patterns are shades of grey, usually with a lighter underside and often with lines and patches of different hue and contrast. Unlike most mammals, dolphins do not have hair, except for a few hairs around the tip of their rostrum (beak) which they lose shortly before or after birth.[23] The only exception to this is the Boto river dolphin, which has persistent small hairs on the rostrum.

Senses

Most dolphins have acute eyesight, both in and out of the water, and they can hear frequencies ten times or more above the upper limit of adult human hearing.[31] Though they have a small ear opening on each side of their head, it is believed hearing underwater is also, if not exclusively, done with the lower jaw, which conducts sound to the middle ear via a fat-filled cavity in the lower jaw bone. Hearing is also used for echolocation, which all dolphins have. Dolphin teeth are believed to function as antennae to receive incoming sound and to pinpoint the exact location of an object.[32] Beyond locating an object, echolocation also provides the animal with an idea on the object’s shape and size, though how exactly this works is not yet understood.[33] The Indus Dolphin is effectively blind. This may be because not much light penetrates the waters of the Indus river (due to suspended sediments), making the need for vision unnecessary.

The dolphin’s sense of touch is also well-developed, with free nerve endings densely packed in the skin, especially around the snout, pectoral fins and genital area. However, dolphins lack an olfactory nerve and lobes, and thus are believed to have no sense of smell.[35] They do have a sense of taste and show preferences for certain kinds of fish. Since dolphins spend most of their time below the surface, tasting the water could function like smelling, in that substances in the water can signal the presence of objects that are not in the dolphin’s mouth.

A group of dolphins is called a “school” or a “pod”. Male dolphins are called “bulls”, females “cows” and young dolphins are called “calves”.